Types of Fibers Available for you:


Carpets are often classified by the type of fiber use to make surface yarns.


Acrylic: a manmade substance, similar to wool in look and feel. It is a plastic fiber made from, acrylonitrile (a clear plastic) and became a major substitute for wool after the 1950’s.


Advantages:

  • wool-like appearance and feel
  • low moisture absorption
  • easy to clean
  • good stain resistance
  • resistant to mildew and moths
  • resistant to sunlight damage

Disadvantages:

  • not as strong as some other synthetic carpets
  • produced in short fibers and crimped
  • poor resistance to matting
  • stained by oil and grease

Nylon: is the most popular synthetic fiber. It comes in continuous or spun fibers-which are made of short length fibers that are spun tightly together. The continuous fibers are less likely to unravel


Advantages:

  • easy to clean
  • extremely durable
  • extreme resistance to matting
  • cost effective-a wide price range
  • good abrasion resistance
  • absorbs little moisture
  • resists moths, mildew, and fungi
  • good stain resistance
  • third and fourth generation fibers are anti-static

Disadvantages:

  • can be stained by oil and gas
  • breaks down and fades in the sunlight

Olefin (polypropylene): is the next-best popular synthetic fiber after nylon. These fibers keep color because the production process involves mixing polypropylene with dyes.


Advantages:

  • easy to clean
  • keeps color
  • strong fibers
  • water and soil resistant
  • good stain resistant
  • resistant to mildew and moths
  • makes good short pile indoor/outdoor carpet

Disadvantages:

  • tends to mat
  • captures oil and grease
  • dry-cleaning solvents degrade fibers

Polyester: while not as popular as nylon or olefin, it is still a very popular synthetic fiber. Polyester once had a reputation for having poor quality. Currently, polyester has improved considerably.


Advantages:

  • soft feel
  • resistant to abrasion
  • resistant to mildew
  • good stain resistance
  • inexpensive

Disadvantages:

  • prolonged exposure to sunlight degrades fibers
  • captures oil and grease

Wool: made from the hair of sheep, some wool rugs are made from the hair of goats, llamas or alpaca. Sheep’s hair grows in a spiral; the fibers have a “memory” when twisted into tufts. The fiber is extremely easy to dye.


Advantages:

  • very good resistance
  • limited piling problems
  • durable

Disadvantages:

  • can soil easily
  • imported because domestic fibers are finer and weaker
  • inexpensive

 Do you have any additional questions about carpet fibers? A StarFloors representative would be happy to help you at any time. Visit www.starfloors.com for more information.